Answering the “How Much Does it Cost” Sales Question

Maybe you are able to relate. You’re at a business event, someone asks what you do and also you tell them. Then comes, “Nice. How much does it cost?”

Or, you get a decision or email from someone who found you online, and there it’s, “How much does it cost?”

If your online business has a group fee structure, then you definitely can quickly and simply respond, in case you choose. For other more service-type businesses (creative services, marketing, etc.) the solution isn’t so simple and sometimes is dependent upon project specifics.

For many smaller, creative service-type businesses it could actually also rely upon the present workload or even the desirability of the customer or project. Regardless, i’ll say that any price you give could be an excessive amount of if the man asking doesn’t fully know, understand, and believe within the value of your product. This bares repeating. Any price you give shall be an excessive amount of if the man asking doesn’t fully know, understand, and believe within the value of your product.

I would even venture to guess that about 95% of the folks asking the question don’t fully know, understand, and believe within the value of your services or products. That’s the difficulty and it often poses a chief dilemma for business owners who provide custom, high-level, or creative services.

Do you sacrifice high, customized quality for a cookie-cutter approach that enables for an outlined, but often more low end, fee structure? Or, do you persist with your guns and concentrate on the kind of clients who value high, customized quality – and will afford it?

For people who choose the later it probably won’t matter the way you answer the pricetag question coming from the kind of person described earlier, because whatever you are saying will, more commonly, be an excessive amount of. So, as opposed to spending time and effort looking to convince those price shoppers that your product is worthwhile, you might have considered trying to focus that point and effort on getting more (qualified) prospects to grasp, understand, and believe within the value of your product.

How you do this may be the focus of a completely new article. But, I’ll offer some parting thoughts for now.

Certainly, referrals from trusted sources are the best way. Additionally, good press — in case you’re lucky enough to get it, good marketplace exposure (if you do good work, and it’s visible, smart folks will always need to know who’s behind it.), talks and presentations (especially in front of the perfect audience), and lastly – great marketing including a lot of smart, engaging, video.

Talking Photo via Shutterstock

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